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Agapé Physician Honored for His Work in Hospice & Palliative Care

Posted by Joe B. Nester on January 19, 2016 at 8:40 PM Comments comments (0)

A person with vision, a forward thinker, someone with fierce leadership ability and a strong advocate for hospice, these are just a few of the criteria taken into consideration when choosing the recipient for the Tamra West Leadership Award.

 

Mrs. West, the awards namesake was The Carolina Centers TCC South Carolina Program Director for over 11 years. She was recognized as a hospice leader for TCC as well as for the entire  state of South Carolina.

 

Dr. Gregory A. Compton, winner of the 2015 Tamra West Leadership Award possess all of the traits, skills and qualities which exemplify leadership in the field of hospice and palliative care.

 

He is currently the medical director of the Palliative Medicine Program for Agapé Hospice and was instrumental in forming the partnership between Trident Health Systems. The program provides palliative care to patients at both Trident Medical Center and Summerville Medical Center in Charleston.

 

Dr. Compton has a unique ability to not only provide care but also to educate teams and pull together resources within the hospital to provide treatment for patients in a holistic manner. He looks beyond the hospital walls and engages other partners, physicians and specialists to provide outpatient palliative care in the Charleston area as well.

 

Dr. Compton's passion for impacting lives, his knowledge, teaching ability, and leadership skills made him a perfect choice as recipient of the award.

 

Dr. Compton is board certified in Internal Medicine with subspecialty certifications in Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Geriatrics, and is a certified Medical Director. He is also currently pursuing his Masters in Bio-Ethics.

 


Nine Partnerships to Enhance Senior Care in South Carolina

Posted by Joe B. Nester on January 8, 2016 at 5:20 PM Comments comments (0)

There is a powerful concept within senior healthcare which  has potential to transform the industry in South Carolina and  possibly become a model for the nation. The concept is not new, complicated or difficult but will require leadership and cooperation between providers of senior care services.

 

The concept is healthcare partnerships. Every provider of senior healthcare in South Carolina should be asking themselves the question. Are my residents and patients receiving the most appropriate level of care today? If the answer is no, then the provider should be seeking partnerships with companies which can provide a yes.

 

Scott Middleton, CEO of Agapé and Author of Parent Talk, "Nine Conversations to have with an Aging Loved One," gave a speech at Marcus Evans, Long Term Care Summit in Florida where he outlined the nine partnerships senior care providers should consider for their communities.

 

For the next nine weeks we will be exploring each of the nine partnerships in greater detail and showing how providers implementing these strategic alliances will benefit residents and the communities in which they live.

 

· Therapy - What is the correlation between therapy, length of stay, and, more importantly, the longevity of residents?

 

· Physician Services - How often should physicians, nurse practitioners or physician assistants be seeing residents?

 

· Skilled Nursing Facility - What are six critical requirements for a skilled nursing partnership?

 

· Pharmacy - How does "Cycle Fill" help with medication administration?

 

· Home Care - What are the benefits of partnering with Home Care?

 

· Real Estate - What role can real estate play in your census?

 

· Durable Medical Equipment - What is an innovation room and why your Durable Medical Provider should set it up?

 

· Hospice - Why hospice is likely the most valuable partner you can have?

 

· Coaching - How coaching can save you time and money from costly mistakes?

 



Agapé Hospice Nursing Staff Hone Skills with Advanced Certification

Posted by Joe B. Nester on December 23, 2015 at 3:15 PM Comments comments (0)

Theresa Younis, Chief Operating Officer for Agapé Hospice has a vision and goal to transform end-of life care in South Carolina. Younis understands investing in medical staff as both clinicians and leaders is paramount to this end. Younis stated, "Having and maintaining one of the best educated clinician staffs in the state directly equates to better care for our patients and families."


 

The Hospice and Palliative Nurse Association HPNA is an organization which has a mission and vision on a National level and has developed certification programs which seek to advance expert care and to transform the care and culture of serious illnesses.


 

Agapé Hospice has elected to obtain certification for its RN's through the HPNA. According to Younis "the certification is a tangible representation of specialized clinical and leadership experience within the hospice field."


 

To date Agapé Hospice has 29 of its RNs certified through the program as Hospice and Palliative Nurses CHPN and an additional 6 RN's who have been certified as CHPN instructors.


 

Dana Altman, RN, CHPN with Agapé Hospice stated, "To achieve board certification was a validation for me that "Yes, I am an expert in this specialty." When you have more knowledge, you have more confidence which benefits both staff and patients. Education and knowledge have the power to transform health care.""


 

Janet DiNino, RN, LNHA, LNC, CHC, CAPPM, Chief Clinical Officer for Agapé Hospice echoes Altman's comments "It caused me to question practices and review policies and procedures daily. It empowered me to think comprehensively and proactively…The certification equips RNs with a broad array of clinical knowledge, skills and competencies."


 

Agapé Hospice has demonstrated its commitment to the HPNA certification program by removing barriers for completion. According to Younis, "Nurses are paid while attending preparatory classes as well as the certification test. And once an RN is certified, they receive a financial reward with an increase in compensation."


 

For more information about Agape Hospice and its mission see AgapeHospice.com or call us at (800) 411-2427

 


Agape Hospice Continues its Ministry by Receiving a Perfect State Survey

Posted by Joe B. Nester on December 20, 2015 at 12:35 AM Comments comments (0)

The South Carolina Department of Health & Environmental Control, the regulatory body that licenses hospices in South Carolina, recently awarded Agape Hospice a Deficiency Free Survey.


The survey involves a rigorous review of every aspect of hospice patient care including charts, proper procedures and processes, staffing and interviews with current patients under care.


Theresa Younis, Chief Operations Officer for Agapé Hospice said, "I am extremely proud of our hospice team and this survey is a testimonial to their hard work and dedication for the entrusted patients within our care.”


Younis also stated, “This achievement is a direct result of Agape Hospice's commitment to the highest standards of ethics and integrity. We are proactive and foster a culture of compliance. We participate in robust continuing education programs and in formal US Department of Labor recognized Apprenticeship programs. We engage an experienced team of experts who assist us in fulfilling our compliance responsibilities. And we always ensure our patients and their families are at the center of every decision we make."

 

For more information about hospice and the services it can provide, contact us at AgapeHospice.com or call (800) 411-2427.

 

Sharing the Gift of Time through Hospice Volunteering

Posted by Joe B. Nester on December 11, 2015 at 9:00 AM Comments comments (0)

Ralph Waldo Emerson once said "It is one of the beautiful compensations of life that no man can sincerely try to help another without helping himself." I believe this describes a hospice volunteer’s experience when spending precious time with a patient. The volunteer’s gift of time may seem like a small thing on the surface but the relationship and impact they can have with the patient and family is immeasurable.


People are sometimes hesitant to get involved with volunteering because they do not believe they have anything to offer. The person may have the gift of time and a desire to make a difference but believe they lack the talent or skills necessary. Kay Lee, Agapé Hospice Volunteer Coordinator for the Rock Hill area tells her volunteer recruits this. "Any talent, hobby or interest you have can and will be incorporated into our volunteer ministry."


When a person makes a commitment to volunteer with hospice, the first step is to get connected through a volunteer coordinator. The coordinator helps the new volunteer acquire the orientation and training required to allow him/her to get started in the field. The training is approximately six hours and is often broken into smaller segments for the convenience of the volunteer.


Not every volunteer in hospice works directly with patients, there are hundreds of ways a volunteer can be utilized in a hospice organization. Hospice sponsored education, events and service projects are just a few of the areas where a volunteer could have an impact. It is the coordinators job to ensure each volunteer is positioned for success in his/her chosen role.


Agapé Hospice serves all 46 Counties in South Carolina and each region of the state has volunteer coordinator's that can answer questions about the ministry. There is a contact form online @ http://www.agapehospice.com/volunteer-form where a person can submit their information to get connected or call 800-411-(Agape) 2427 for more information.

 



Understanding Physicians Role in End-Of Life Journey

Posted by Joe B. Nester on November 12, 2015 at 9:25 AM Comments comments (0)

Recently medical professionals within Agapé Hospice had an opportunity to attend specialized training focusing on their role in the end-of life journey. Kashyap Patel, MD, a nationally renowned oncologist and President of the South Carolina Oncology Society along with Jeff Brantley, MD, founding faculty member of Duke Integrative Medicine, were the presenters.


The nonprofit Institute of Medicine's report, Dying in America, published last September, found that the vast majority of people in the U.S. have never had an end-of-life discussion with a health care provider. Better education focused on end-of life comprehension within the medical community is a great place to start the conversation.


Dr. Patel's Education in Palliative and End of Life Care (EPEC) training helps medical professionals identify the importance of their role in the end-of life process. When families find themselves in such crisis, the person to whom they look for advice, assurance, and even comfort is the physician. Because of this, physicians must be comfortable not only talking with families about end of life realities but actually being an important active part of that end of life journey. Dr. Patel's training teaches physicians the emotional toll these activities can have and to be cognizant of their own mental and physical well-being.


Dr. Brantley's Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) training addresses proactive steps medical professionals can take when confronted with the stress related to working in the healthcare industry. MBSR is a method of using meditation and yoga to promote awareness and reduce stress. The techniques are based on an ancient practice of mindfulness, which is about waking up, being fully alive, and present for the wealth of each moment in our lives. Through this process medical professionals gain access to their inner resources for living and healing.

 

For more information on these programs please contact

Grace Waddell, Dean of Agapé University.

gwaddell@agapesenior.com


http://www.agapehospice.com/



 




Journey Through Understanding

Posted by Joe B. Nester on October 15, 2015 at 4:00 PM Comments comments (1)

There are probably not many things in life as difficult as caring for someone with Alzheimer's. In the case of a husband or a wife caring for a spouse the difficulty is magnified by the additional grief of loss as their partner effectively slips through time into a past life that may not include them.


The caregiving process is a long road strewn with new challenges as the disease moves through its stages. Updating skills along the way becomes essential for a caregiver. Experts on the subject can offer insights into some of the latest techniques and workshops can offer opportunities for upgraded skills along with a chance to bond with people facing similar challenges.


Caregivers should not try to go-it alone. Burnout is an all too real danger and proactive steps should be considered to avoid its pitfalls. Taking time to talk with family and friends, researching websites, attending workshops and joining support groups are activities caregivers can take to avoid problems with their own health.


Every day may bring opportunities for a caregiver to enter into the world of their loved one. And every day there may be beautiful discoveries made within that world. The more a caregiver understands about the disease and its progression the better chance of having a successful journey.


http://agapesenior.com/hospice.html

 


Jolene Brackey; Creating Moments of Joy

Posted by Joe B. Nester on October 12, 2015 at 9:25 AM Comments comments (0)


Agapé Hospice is proud to welcome Jolene Brackey, author of "Creating Moments of Joy" back to South Carolina for two half day workshops on October, 14th and 15th at the Agapé Senior Conference Center on Main Street.


Jolene, who truly has a gift for creating moments of joy for dementia patients teaches caregivers the importance of finding where patients believe they are in their own mind. This foundational step is necessary to gain the understanding and patience required to change the communications process.


With changes in the way caregivers communicate, Jolene teaches techniques that allow caregivers to discover the hidden treasures within each patient.


A moment of joy created between a patient and a caregiver will instantly be forgotten by the patient but the good feeling generated by the memory can linger on giving the patient a feeling of peace and well-being.


Jolene believes there is no way to create a perfectly wonderful day for a dementia patient but there are lots of ways to create perfectly wonderful moments. Jolene's insights will give caregivers the necessary tools to enable more positive patient outcomes. Creating these positive outcomes will ultimately lead to a calmer environment for both patient and caregiver.


For More Information contact Beckie Cunningham bcunningham@agapesenior.com


https://agapesenior.com/hospice/agape-hospice.html


 


The Alzheimer's Epidemic

Posted by Joe B. Nester on August 13, 2015 at 12:20 AM Comments comments (0)

Alzheimer's is a devastating disease for both patient and caregiver. In 2015, Alzheimer's continues its epidemic rampage through our senior population in South Carolina and the nation. According to the Alzheimer's Association, there are 5,300,000 people in the United States with the disease and 5,100,000 of those are over the age of 65. Almost two thirds or 3.200,000 are women. By 2025, it is estimated 7,000,000 people will have the disease, which is a 40 percent increase in just 10 years.


There is new evidence suggesting the disparity between men and women is not just attributed to a longer life span for women. In a recent Washington Post article, Kristine Yaffe, a professor of psychiatry, neurology and epidemiology at the University of California at San Francisco said "It's not just that women are living to be older, there's something else going on in terms of biology and environment for woman compared to men that may make them at greater risk or, if they have some symptoms, may change the progression.”


There are some promising drugs on the horizon and the BBC recently reported on one from the Eli Lilly Company that may have the ability to slow the progression of the disease. Solanezumab, has shown some promise in people with early stages of the disease and in some tests halted progression of the disease by as much as one-third.


Slowing down the progression of Alzheimer's, if proven to be successful, would truly be a breakthrough in the fight for a cure. Today medications only deal with symptoms of the disease and do not have any effect on the progression.


Meanwhile as researches and scientists work toward a cure, caregivers are using more innovative approaches for connecting with their patients. Music, light, art, aroma along with dozens of other techniques for stimulation are helping caregivers provide a better quality of life for the patient or loved one.


Education for families and caregivers is still one of the most significant components for improving the experience of both caregiver and patient. Learning new skills and techniques that allow a caregiver to enter the world of an Alzheimer patient is invaluable for ultimately gaining the understanding and compassion required for a positive interaction.


Agape Senior

 

Ambassadors for Lexington Hospice House and Suites

Posted by Joe B. Nester on June 9, 2015 at 2:00 PM Comments comments (0)



On a cold and windy November evening in 2011 a hospice memorial service was held on the steps of the South Carolina Statehouse. The service was the conclusion of a two day celebration designed to raise public awareness about hospice. Holli McGee Roberts stepped to the podium and in 48 short words defined perfectly what hospice had meant to her family.

 

"Agapé Hospice was there for us; they wrapped their arms around our family and helped us through the dark times. Like the umbrellas' here tonight, Agapé Hospice sheltered us from a storm. I will always remember their support, their loving care they gave to my Mother, Emma McGee"


Holli had lost her best friend when her Mom, Emma McGee died in August of 2010. Her Mom had been through what seemed like a lifetime of battling cancer. The first sign of trouble had come in the form of breast cancer when Holli was just eight years old. This was followed with a long period of remission until cancer resurfaced 18 years later in another form. At this point Holli was married and raising a young family.


For the next three and a half years Holli along with her family dug in for a battle. Holli became the primary caregiver along with her dad Carroll McGee and took daily care of her Mother while trying to raise her own young family. Holli started to show all of the classic signs of caregiver burnout during this time including the degradation of her own health.


Hospice was called in during the final stages of Emma's life which allowed Holli some precious time to just be present with her Mom. Emma was on hospice for just seven days before she passed peacefully into the next life.


Looking back on her experience, Holli wished she had been aware of hospice earlier in the struggle. Spending quality time with her Mom without constantly worrying about the actual care would have been the best gift Holli could have received.


Holli and Carroll are now Ambassadors for the new Lexington Agapé Hospice House & Suites that just opened in June of 2015. Carroll will be a part-time Chaplain for the facility and Holli will volunteer and continue her advocacy for hospice.

 


 




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